(9) The Story in the Pictures (pages 93 through 113)

48. page 93 Left – Two characters sitting at the table under a leafy canopy, drinking a glass of wine (?)

49. page 95 Left – The Holy Trinity. This is a very disputed concept, and I am always lost when it comes to the subtleties of dogma. Basically, it says that The Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost are three distinct manifestations of the same God, they are not equivalent among them, yet they are not independent, each of them exists in each of the other two. It is a difficult idea to grasp but it is at the core of the Nicene creed and of the majority of Christian churches. These are the Trinitarians. Obviously, that means that other churches are Unitarians or Binitarians.  (I might be wrong though – this is a subject debated for over a thousand years, it lead to several schisms and accusations of heresy and anathemas were thrown around vigorously on its account.)

While in Eastern Christianity, when on its own, it is represented by three twin figures (see the famous Rubliov icon), in  Western Christianity it is depicted by two men as the Father and the Son and a dove as the Holy Ghost.

What about our CR drawing? It is clear that the source was something similar to the miniature below, yet somehow, the Holy Ghost got lost.

Petites Heures de Jean de Berry, fol. 70 Maître de la Trinité, c. 1385-1390, from BNF, Bestiaire du Moyen Age

Petites Heures de Jean de Berry, fol. 70
Maître de la Trinité, c. 1385-1390, from BNF, Bestiaire du Moyen Age

If this is not a gaffe but a deliberate option, probably this definition fits (from Wikipedia):

Bitheism, a belief in two separate beings in one “God family” who are in perfect harmony/agreement with each other/one another, composed of the Father and the Son as two distinct Gods, and the Holy Spirit as not a God, but rather as the living power of God that flows/emanates between both the Father and the Son.

50. page 98 Right – Ante portas. A high priest and Jesus (or an apostle), the priest has a magic wand, Jesus has a cross.

51. page 99 Right – I’m completely clueless.

I reached a line again but I go on, it was a small stack (and I have accomplished so little).

52. page 100 Left – St. Paul in prison, writing an epistle (?) The character is writing, kneeling at a desk, he seems to be in an enclosed space. From above, rays of undulating light generate from an aperture in the ceiling. Or they rather generate from a globe with a letter inscribed, like the Greek “m”. A letter that might be in fact Hebrew, a sign for one of the personae of God, as in in the Weigel drawing.

Paul receives inspiration as he writes the epistle, Biblia Ectypa, Christoph Weigel, from artbible

Paul receives inspiration as he writes the epistle, Biblia Ectypa, Christoph Weigel, from artbible

53. page 102 Right – A very friendly sun shines above a standing roman official (?) and a kneeling man. The standing man has a “rattler”.

54. page 104 Right – Healing a baby. For some time I could not understand what the two men are holding. The one on the right has a lily but the one on the left looked like holding a giant bug. After carefully counting the limbs and the odds of the creature being an insect, I decided it is a child.

This is not a drawing, it is a line on page 105 left, the end of another batch.

55. page 105 Right – Scribe presenting the manuscript to king commissioner.

Just for the fun of it : Uther Pendragon and Merlin

King Uther Pendragon conversing with Merlin while Igraine is watching, Chronicle of England, England, c. 1307-c. 1327, Peter Langtoft, from British Library

King Uther Pendragon conversing with Merlin while Igraine is watching, Chronicle of England, England, c. 1307-c. 1327, Peter Langtoft, from British Library

56. page 108 Right – the magic wand, again.

57. page 110 RightThe lamentation of Jeremiah.

A similar drawing is the one from page 65 Left, which I identified as Jeremiah lamenting over Jerusalem.

page 65 Left

page 65 Left

I did not change my mind…

a. Christ Wept over the City of Jerusalem.  b. Jeremiah Lamented over Jerusalem. Speculum humanæ salvationis , Chapter XV. Bibliothèque de l'Arsenal, Paris, Ms. lat. 593, in A Medieval Mirror, Adrian Wilson & Joyce Lancaster Wilson, page. 54, from UC Press E-Books Collection, 1982-2004

a. Christ Wept over the City of Jerusalem. b. Jeremiah Lamented over Jerusalem.
Speculum humanæ salvationis , Chapter XV. Bibliothèque de l’Arsenal, Paris, Ms. lat. 593, in A Medieval Mirror, Adrian Wilson & Joyce Lancaster Wilson, page. 54, from UC Press E-Books Collection, 1982-2004

58. page 113 Left – David worshiping God – It is an image used in Books of Hours in the Penitential Psalms section.

avid praying in Tres Riches Heures du Duc de Berry, fol 48v, Limbourg brothers, c. 1410, from christusrex

David praying in Tres Riches Heures du Duc de Berry, fol 48v, Limbourg brothers, c. 1410, from christusrex

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One Response to (9) The Story in the Pictures (pages 93 through 113)

  1. Izzy says:

    51. page 99 Right. Take a look at this, probably there were a cross in this: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Uluch,_Yucat%C3%A1n_%2806%29.JPG

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